The phenomenon of nationality in our species is a subset of group identity. Group/social identity, in turn, goes back
thousands (and millions) of years, to all past human societies, pre-human primates, and social carnivores. Through
countless centuries and millenia of observational learning and intergenerational transfers, human heritages of
nationality (the most prestigious and sovereign of our social identities) have solidified into cultural heritages.
Nationality
in World History
traces the phenomenon of group identity from its pre-human evolutionary roots, to the prehistoric
development of uniquely human social characteristics, through the ancient,
medieval, and modern eras of world history.
From latter pre-history onwards, we identify three primary heritages
of nationality (sovereign group formation) in our
species.
These are:
the Kinship-Ethnic Heritage, the Territorial-Civic Heritage, and the Pastoral-Charismatic Dependency Heritage


CONTENTS:

 Nationality in World History                                                                                                                     805 pp          

Acknowledgments                                                                                                                                      i-ii        

Preface/Introduction                                                                                                                                 1-20       

Section One: Definitions and Theory (1)                                                                                                  21        

1. “What Is A Nationality?” (28)
                                                                                                             22-50

2. “Why Do We Create Nationalities?” (84)                                                                                         51-133

3. “How Have People Formed and Maintained Nationalities?” (36)                                               134-170

Section Two: How Have National Identities Evolved in European History? (2)                              170-171

4. “State Formation & Proto-Nationalities in the Ancient Near East” (70)                                      172-237

5. “Single and Multiethnic Nationalities in the Ancient Mediterranean” (94)                                238-332

6. “Rome, Venice, and the Third Nationality Cycle” (50)                                                                   333-383

7. “Portugal and Spain: From Pathfinders to Backwaters” (28)                                                       384-402

8. “Multiethnicity and the Making of English Nationality” (41)                                                        403-444

9. “First New Nation: Rise of the Dutch Model” (40)                                                                         445-485

10. “The Evolution of Russian National Identity” (33)                                                                       486-519

11. “The European Union: Supranational Unifier?” (29)                                                                   520-549

Section Three: How Have National Identities Evolved Beyond Europe? (2)                                  550-551

12. “The Yellow, the Yangtze, and the World’s Largest Nation” (34)                                              552-586

13. “The Origins of American National Identity” (35)                                                                         587-622

14. “The Limits of Rhetoric: Unifications and Articulations of Mexican Nationality” (31)             623-654

15. “Beyond Kinship: Nationality Through Tanzanian History” (26)                                                655-681

16. “Towards the Civic? Imperial and Modern India” (25)                                                               682-707

Conclusions and Notes:

17. Key Findings (40)                                                                                                                           
708-748

18. Lexicon (20)                                                                                                                                    749-769

   Index (35)                                                                                                                                         770-805
Bibliographies/References (in chapter)








Copyright 2008 Philip L. White and Michael L. White
Ethnic
Civic
Charismatic-Authoritarian
Nationality
Your name:
Your email address:
Comments:
Oad as powerpoint slide figure 14b ludwig angina. viagra without doctor prescription (a) photograph shows marked inflammatory swelling in the floor of the mouth of a 62-year-old man. Viagra for sale (courtesy of michael gilhooly, frcs, fdsrcs, northwick park hospital, harrow, england. Generic viagra ) (b) axial stir mr image obtained in another patient who underwent a dental extraction 3 days earlier shows extensive inflammatory changes in the right side of the floor of the mouth (*) that extend to the submandibular (curved arrow) and parapharyngeal (arrowhead) spaces. The straight arrow indicates the mylohyoid muscle. Genric viagra price M = mandible. viagra buy on line no prescription canada Submandibular duct obstruction the main submandibular duct, which courses through the sublingual space, may become obstructed by calculi or strictures. viagra online without prescription The submandibular gland, which accounts for 85% of all salivary gland calculi, is prone to calculous disease because of the high mucus content and viscous nature of its secretions (1,16). Viagra for sale Between 80% and 90% of the calculi are opaque and therefore visible on radiographs (16). Ct has the highest sensitivity for the detection of submandibular gland calculi, particularly when multiple calculi are present (17). viagra no prescription canada Although us is operator dependent, it can reliably depict ductal obstruction and calculi as small as 3 mm (18). Order viagra canada A calculus typically appears at us as an area of hyperechogenicity with a posterior acoustic shadow; however, a very small calculus might lack a shadow (fig 15 ). viagra without a prescription View larger version: in this window in a new window download as powerpoint slide figure 15a submandibular duct obstruction by calculi. Generic viagra price (a) unenhanced axial ct image shows calculi in both proximal (arrow) and distal (arrowhead) locations in the left submandibular duct. (b) sagittal oblique us image of the floor of the mouth shows a calculus (arrow) in the distal submandibular duct. real viagra without a prescription The calculus casts an acoustic shadow. where to get viagra fast in san diego no prescription The main submandibular duct (arrowhead) is dilated and the submandibular gland (smg) is inflamed because of the obstruction. generic viagra no prescription View larger version: in this window in a new window download as powerpoint slide figure 15b submandibular duct obstruction by calculi. Viagra for sale (a) unenhanced axial ct image shows calculi in both proximal (arrow) and distal (arrowhead) locations in the left submandibular duct. viagra online without prescription (b) sagittal o. viagra without a doctor s prescription Buy cheap generic viagra online
Leave a Message
Primates:
monkeys
baboons
gorillas
chimpanzees
bonobos
Social Carnivores:
hyenas
lions
wild dogs
wolves
Anthropology:
a.afarensis
a.africanus
h.habilis
h.ergaster
h.erectus
h.heidelberg
h.neanderthal
h.sapiens sapiens (cro-magnons)
Prehistory:
hunter-gatherers
herders
farmers
Ancient- First Nationality Cycle:
Mesopotamia/Sumer
Ancient Egypt
Hebrews
Hittites
'Sea Peoples'
Ancient- Second Nationality Cycle:
Greeks  
Athens  
Sparta  
Roman kingdom  
Roman Republic  
Roman Empire  
'barbarians'  

Medieval Europe- Third Nationality Cycle:
Anglo-Saxons  
Post-Roman Gaul  
Byzantium  
Venetian Republic  
Christendom  

Early/Modern Europe:
Portugal  
Spain  
England & U.K.
Netherlands  
Russia  
European Union  

Beyond Europe:
Ancient China  
Early America  
Mexico  
Tanzania  
India  
(may not read correctly with older Internet browsers)
The History of a Social Phenomenon